Thought Leadership

A Proust Questionnaire for Personality Brands: Laurel & Hardy

New York, NY, December 3, 2018 | By: Martin Cribbs - Most celebrities aren’t brands. Legendary icons are. Coinciding with this month’s release of the feature film Stan & Ollie, we’re focusing on the famous and beloved comedic duo Laurel & Hardy.

A Proust Questionnaire for Personality Brands: Farrah Fawcett

New York, NY, Oct. 11, 2018 | By: Martin Cribbs - Most celebrities aren’t brands.  Legendary icons are. This month we’re focusing on Farrah Fawcett and spoke to Alana Stewart, an actress, model, and the President and CEO for our client, the Farrah Fawcett Foundation.  Ms. Stewart was one of Farrah’s closest friends and answered this month’s questionnaire.

Brandspeak: Ready, Set, Go! Brands Disrupting Travel Today

July 27, 2018 | By: Allison Ames, President & CEO, Beanstalk

Of course, the desire to travel and see the world is nothing new. But changes in our needs, tastes and habits are fueling disruption in a space that is driven by consumer behavior.

A Proust Questionnaire for Personality Brands: Harvey Milk

In a famous episode of HBO’s hit series Entourage, the main character Vincent Chase goes from talent agency to talent agency, with each firm promising to make him a “brand.” Unbeknownst to each agency Chase visits, every pitch is presented as an original, brilliant, never-been-done-before idea.

'Blurred Lines' Decisions Offer Lessons For Advertising Agencies Using Sound-Alikes

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently upheld the district court's decision finding Robin Thicke’s and Pharrell Williams’ chart-topping 2013 hit "Blurred Lines" infringed the copyright on Marvin Gaye's song "Got To Give It Up." The Ninth Circuit also upheld the district court’s award of more than $3 million in actual damages, $5 million in infringer’s profits and a continuing royalty of 50% of future songwriter and publishing revenues generated from the song.

Cabbage Patch Kids Provide A Wake-Up Call On License Contracts

When trademark licensors grant a licensee exclusive rights to manufacture and sell licensed products, they often reserve the right to engage in negotiations with one or more potential replacement licensees during a certain period of time before the conclusion of the exclusive license agreement.